ONS Daily

Nobel Foundation Reverses Decision to Invite Russia to Prize Ceremony Following Backlash

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Pocket
WhatsApp

Nobel Foundation Reverses Decision to Invite Russia to Prize Ceremony

In a surprising turn of events, the Nobel Foundation has reversed its earlier decision to invite the ambassadors of Russia, Belarus, and Iran to the upcoming Nobel Prize award ceremony. This decision of Nobel Foundation to Invite Russia to Prize Ceremony comes after the foundation faced widespread criticism and condemnation for its initial choice.

Nobel Foundation Reverses Decision to Invite Russia to Prize Ceremony Following Backlash

The foundation’s initial announcement, which aimed to involve ambassadors from these three countries, even if their values did not align with those of the Nobel Prize, was met with sharp disapproval. Ukraine, in particular, expressed strong condemnation for this decision, given that the Russian and Belarusian ambassadors were excluded from the Nobel Prize awards ceremony in Stockholm the previous year due to the ongoing conflict in Ukraine. A Swedish member of the European Parliament labeled the decision as “extremely inappropriate.”

In a press release issued on a Saturday, the Nobel Foundation stated, “The decision by the Nobel Foundation to invite all ambassadors to the Nobel Prize award ceremony, in accordance with previous practice, has provoked strong reactions.” The foundation went on to clarify that their rationale for this decision was based on the belief that it is essential to disseminate the values and messages represented by the Nobel Prize as widely as possible.

The statement also made reference to the previous year’s Nobel Peace Prize, which was awarded to human rights advocates from Russia and Belarus, as well as Ukrainians working to document Russian war crimes. The foundation acknowledged the significant backlash generated by its decision in Sweden and, as a result, opted to revert to the exceptional practice of not inviting the ambassadors of Russia, Belarus, and Iran to the Nobel Prize award ceremony in Stockholm.

This reversal of the foundation’s decision received positive responses from key figures. Sweden’s Prime Minister, Ulf Kristersson, welcomed the change, expressing his support through a post on the social media platform X. Meanwhile, Oleg Nikolenko, a spokesperson for Ukraine’s Ministry for Foreign Affairs, hailed it as a “restoration of justice” in a post on Facebook.

Nobel Foundation Reverses Decision to Invite Russia to Prize Ceremony Following Backlash

The Nobel Banquet, where five out of six Nobel Prizes are awarded, is held annually in Stockholm on December 10th, while the Nobel Peace Prize is presented in Oslo, Norway.

The exclusion of Russians and Belarusians from various international events has become commonplace since Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, which has received substantial support from Belarus, commenced in February 2022. Athletes from Russia and Belarus have faced bans from participating in numerous sporting competitions, and diplomats from these nations frequently find themselves excluded from important summits.

In a separate development, Berit Reiss-Andersen, the chair of the Nobel committee, accused Russia of attempting to silence Nobel Peace Prize-winning journalist Dmitry Muratov. This accusation came after Russia designated Muratov as a “foreign agent” under a law that was expanded in December 2022. This law requires individuals or organizations that receive funding or support from abroad to be classified as “foreign agents.” Reiss-Andersen emphasized that Dmitry Muratov was honored with the Nobel Peace Prize in 2021 for his tireless efforts in promoting freedom of speech, freedom of information, and independent journalism. She characterized the accusations against him as politically motivated and expressed sadness at the Russian authorities’ actions.

Nobel Foundation Reverses Decision to Invite Russia to Prize Ceremony Following Backlash

The Nobel Foundation’s reversal regarding the ambassadors’ invitations to the Nobel Prize ceremony underscores the complex diplomatic and political tensions at play on the global stage, particularly in the context of the ongoing Ukraine crisis and Russia’s actions.

Related Post:

FAQs Nobel Foundation Reverses Decision to Invite Russia to Prize Ceremony

1. Why did the Nobel Foundation initially decide to invite the ambassadors of Russia, Belarus, and Iran to the Nobel Prize award ceremony, despite criticism?

The article mentions that the Nobel Foundation initially planned to invite these ambassadors, even if their values didn’t align with the Nobel Prize. Understanding the foundation’s rationale behind this initial decision would provide clarity on their intentions.

2. What was the reaction from Ukraine regarding the initial decision to invite the Russian and Belarusian ambassadors?

The article mentions that Ukraine had condemned the decision. Learning more about Ukraine’s specific concerns and reactions would provide insight into the diplomatic tensions surrounding this issue.

3. Why did the Nobel Foundation reverse its decision to invite these ambassadors to the award ceremony?

The article briefly discusses the foundation’s decision to reverse its initial invitation, citing strong reactions in Sweden. A deeper explanation of the factors and considerations that led to this reversal would be informative.

4. How did key figures, such as Sweden’s Prime Minister and Ukraine’s Ministry for Foreign Affairs, respond to the Nobel Foundation’s decision to exclude the Russian, Belarusian, and Iranian ambassadors?

The article mentions positive responses from these figures, but further details on their statements and reactions would help understand the broader diplomatic implications of the decision.

5. What is the significance of Russia designating Nobel Peace Prize-winning journalist Dmitry Muratov as a “foreign agent”?

The article briefly touches on this development but doesn’t provide extensive context. An explanation of the implications of Russia’s actions toward Muratov and the potential impact on freedom of speech and journalism in Russia would be valuable.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Pocket
WhatsApp

Never miss any important news. Subscribe to our newsletter.

Leave a comment

Recent News