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Putin’s Statement on Ukraine: Weapons Supplies Must Stop for Quick End to War

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Putin’s quick way to end war:

In a rare and extensive discussion with war correspondents and bloggers, Russian President Vladimir Putin addressed the ongoing conflict in Ukraine, mixing bravado with controversial statements and the possibility of peace talks. During the two-hour session, Putin claimed that Ukraine has suffered “catastrophic” losses in its counteroffensive, with significantly higher casualties and disabled battle tanks compared to Russia. He even hinted at the possibility of making another attempt to seize Kyiv, the Ukrainian capital. Putin blamed the West for derailing a peace deal negotiated in March 2022 and proposed that the fighting would end swiftly if the United States and NATO halted their military support to Ukraine. According to him, ceasing weapons supplies would be sufficient to achieve a negotiated solution.

Putin, Ukraine war, weapons supplies

Here are the latest developments in the Ukraine conflict:

1. Putin Overnight Attacks and Damage:

Russia launched overnight attacks targeting Ukraine’s two largest cities, Kyiv and Kharkiv. Kyiv officials reported successfully repelling Moscow’s missiles using air defenses, while Kharkiv Mayor Ihor Terekhov stated that a drone strike damaged a utilities business and a warehouse in the city’s northeast. Additionally, floodwaters near the city of Kherson resulting from the Kakhovka Dam disaster were found to contain small amounts of E. coli, cholera, fuel, and other toxic chemicals.

2. Alleged Sabotage of Nord Stream Pipelines:

The CIA reportedly warned Ukraine in June 2022 against sabotaging the Nord Stream pipelines, which transport Russian natural gas to Germany. The Dutch military intelligence agency, MIVD, provided the tip that led to the CIA’s warning. Although plans to blow up the pipelines were reportedly called off, explosions occurred three months later, damaging Nord Stream 1 and Nord Stream 2 in the Baltic Sea. The culprits remain unidentified, and Ukraine denies involvement.

 

3. Attack on Zelenskyy’s Hometown:

Russia launched an overnight attack on Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s native city of Kryvyi Rih. Six cruise missiles struck a residential building and four other non-military targets, resulting in the deaths of 11 people and injuries to 36 others. The attack caused significant damage to multiple structures. Officials in Dnipropetrovsk province, which is dealing with the aftermath of the Kakhovka Dam collapse, condemned the act as a “bloody terrorist attack” perpetrated by the Kremlin.

4. US Military Aid to Ukraine:

The Pentagon announced a $325 million military aid package for Ukraine, which includes anti-aircraft missiles to defend against Russian missile and drone attacks. This latest package adds to the $40 billion worth of weapons, ammunition, and training previously provided by the Biden administration. The aid also includes infantry fighting vehicles and armored personnel carriers to protect Ukrainian troops involved in an offensive against entrenched Russian forces in eastern and southern Ukraine.

5. NATO’s Call for Defense Spending:

During a meeting with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, President Joe Biden expressed support for the alliance’s initiative to require member nations to spend at least 2% of their GDP on defense. Stoltenberg emphasized the need for allies to invest in shared security, and discussions on this topic are expected during the upcoming NATO meeting in Vilnius, Lithuania. Stoltenberg commended the courage and determination of Ukrainian forces, but he warned of the difficult and bloody nature of the ongoing offensive against well-fortified Russian troops.

Putin's Statement on Ukraine: Weapons Supplies Must Stop for Quick End to War

6. Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Plant and Dam Breach:

The breach of the Kakhovka Dam, blamed on Russian forces, has raised concerns about the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant. The reservoir’s water level has been steadily decreasing since the breach, which threatens the plant’s cooling capacity. IAEA Director General Rafael Grossi visited Kyiv and inspected the plant, reassuring that there is no immediate danger. However, the situation remains serious due to limited water availability and the potential for further damage.

Stay informed with these live updates on the Ukraine conflict, including Putin’s statements, ongoing attacks, international responses, and the complexities of the war. The situation remains fluid, and efforts to reach a resolution continue amidst the devastating consequences for both Ukraine and Russia.

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